Calculation of annual cancer cost

of $741 billion

in the 38 most industrialized countries in the world

 

 

 

In the 38 industrialized countries[1], [[i]] identified as those with Very High Human Development with a total population of 989 million,

 

the total cost for cancer is $741 billion/year.

 

This cost, calculated as the total cost for cancer[2] in the U.S. in 2008 is $228.1 billion, divided by the population as of July 1st, 2008 of 304 million [[ii]],

 

equals $750/per-capita annually.

 



[1] The 38 most industrialized countries listed by the Human Development Index (HDI) are: 1. Norway, 2. Australia, 3. Iceland, 4. Canada, 5. Ireland, 6. The Netherlands, 7. Sweden, 8. France, 9. Switzerland, 10. Japan, 11. Luxemburg, 12. Finland, 13. United States, 14. Austria, 15. Spain, 16. Denmark, 17. Belgium, 18. Italy, 19. Liechtenstein, 20. New Zealand, 21. United Kingdom, 22. Germany, 23.Singapore, 24. Hong Kong, 25. Greece, 26. South Korea, 27. Israel, 28. Andorra, 29. Slovenia, 30. Brunei, 31. Kuwait, 32. Cyprus, 33. Qatar, 34. Portugal, 35. United Arab Emirates, 36. Czech Republic, 37. Barbados, 38. Malta

[2] $228.1 billion total, split as $93.2 billion for direct medical costs (total of all health expenditures); $18.8 billion for indirect morbidity costs (cost of lost productivity due to illness); and $116.1 billion for indirect mortality costs (cost of lost productivity due to premature death).



[[i]] 38 industrialized countries (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developed_country)

[[ii]] NIH, costs of cancer, 2008 www.cancer.org/downloads/STT/500809web.pdf